Fresh Finds Part 4


In this instalment of Fresh Finds, we take a trip down memory lane reminiscing about 3 creative campaigns that still have us talking.

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Today’s Fresh Finds selection is brought to you by our UK office’s masterful Head of Design, Chris Edwards, and he’s chosen to do something a little different this week. Analysis has shown that UK brands are falling behind some of their global counterparts in taking chances and producing truly brave advertising.

In 2020, 100 of the biggest global brands increased their value by 5.8% whilst the top 75 UK brands saw a decline of 13%. Innovation and communication are believed to be the key areas where there’s increasing divide. So, do UK brands need to take more chances, yes, we believe they do.

In this instalment of Fresh Finds, Chris is taking us on a little trip down memory lane by highlighting some of the brave advertising campaigns that had creatives around the world thinking, “damn, I wish I’d done that!”. These campaigns connected on a human level whilst creating genuine long-term impact. We hope they inspire you to push the creative limits with your brands and do the type of work that’s so fresh it makes your stomach ache with excitement and angst at the same time. Enjoy!

Nike’s ‘For once, don’t do It’

Nike made the bold move of flipping its brand slogan in a bid to combat racism and support racial equality. “For once, don’t do it,” is a powerful message which once again shows Nike is a brand that isn’t afraid to stand up for what they believe in, however political.

Burger King’s ‘Could you be our Burger Queen?

Burger King celebrated International Women's Day by presenting each female customer with a burger box which included a mirror to reflect their faces, symbolising that every woman is a Burger Queen. The "Who will be crowned Burger Queen?" campaign was a huge hit and went a long way in helping to highlight gender disparity in China.

Always’ #LikeAGirl.

The expression ‘like a girl’, is often used as an insult to tease somebody who is seen to be weak. The phrase insinuates that strength is for men, not for women. And that boys should be raised not to be a girl, as if being female is ‘not good enough’. This clever ad, which first aired at the Super Bowl back in 2015, aimed to dispel the negative stereotype, and boost the self-confidence of young girls in doing so.

How can brands be braver?

Fear is often what leads to uninspiring campaigns. It can chip away at a good idea until there’s little left of it and it’s a watered-down version of its former great self. Producing brave work that has a lasting impact requires being brave yourself. Don’t blend into the wash of advertising wallpaper. Trust your creative team to help you bring your brand’s core purpose to life. You’re all working towards the same end goal - to create an epic campaign that lives way longer than your media spend. end goal (and to sell, sell, sell of course.

Ready to make your brand famous? Good, because we’re ready to help you do just that.                          

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